Tag Archives: dogs

Ensure Your Pets Are Cared For

Steps to Ensure that Your Pets are Well Taken Care of When You Can No Longer Provide Care

By guest blogger Jessica Brody

The average life expectancy of a Labrador Retriever is 12 years. Overall, pets have a shorter life span when compared to that of humans. Even though you know this fact, it is still difficult to cope with their death. Have you ever wondered how your pets would feel when you are no longer here? What will happen to them in case they outlive you?

Senior pet owners consider pets a part of their family. Which is why it becomes your responsibility to make plans to secure the future of your pets. Some of the steps that you should take to ensure that your pets are well taken care:

Choose caregivers from among your friends and family

Have a talk with your friends and family, and choose at least two caregivers (people who are willing
to take on the responsibility). In case something happens to you or there is an emergency, these people will act as emergency caregivers. Ensure that you give them all the details such your veterinarian’s name and any special instructions about feeding and caring for the pet. Remember to give them spare keys to your home, and let them know about whatever permanent provisions you have made.

  • Keep your neighbors informed

You may be close to your family and friends. However, if you live alone, they are not the ones that are always around you. Your neighbors can be a great help in situations where you are incapacitated. Therefore, see to it that your neighbors are well informed about your pets. Tell them how many pets you have and what their names are. Provide them with contact numbers of your temporary caregivers as well as your emergency contact details.

  • Find out more about organizations that take care of pets

Most of the organizations cannot take care of your pets after you are unable to because they severely lack funds. They may be able to look after them for a while, until they are handed over to your permanent caregiver. However, there are some sanctuaries and pet retirement homes that dedicate themselves to take care of pets whose owners are no longer around. All you need to do is pay them a small donation, and they will take care of your pets. However, this must be used as a last resort as pets may very well be distressed because of the confinement.

  • Include pets in your will

Your lawyer can help you draw the kind of documents needed to include pets in your will. While this will ensure you have taken care of all the legal details related to your pets, you should be aware of its downsides. For one, your will may come under dispute, and it may take weeks or even months to resolve it. For another, it may actually take some time for your pet care instructions to be carried out.

  • Set up a pet trust

According to the American Animal Hospital Association, 47 percent of pet owners are willing to spend any amount of money to save their pets. So a trust fund doesn’t seem that far-fetched, does it? A pet trust is a legal document that can provide for your pets when you become ill or incapacitated. In fact, you can choose when the trust should come into effect. The best thing about these trusts is that during the probate process, certain assets can be excluded.

It is always good to be prepared for worst case scenarios. Making future plans for your pets makes certain that they don’t suffer much after you can no longer take care of them.

We have created a short booklet that walks you through setting up a plan for your pets should you become unexpectedly ill and can't get to them. We'll send one to the first 50 people who email haley@bogobowl.com. 

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Foods Dog Can Have at Your Labor Day Cookout

Labor Day = play day!By Lyndsay Marvin

It’s officially Labor Day Weekend! Labor Day is often associated with the end of summer, which is a bummer, but also a time for amazing cookouts, which is great! If you’re anything like us, you’re going to bring your dogs to your cookouts and gatherings. Dogs make everything better, especially when you have a plate of food that you can’t quite finish. They’re the best dishwashers! Since your dog is going to be surrounded by delicious food you and your friends/family are cooking,

Here’s a list of foods dogs can eat (within moderation of course).

  • Eggs (fully cooked)
  • Turkey
  • Chicken
  • Cheese (in moderation)
  • Shrimp
  • Peanut butter (without xylitol)
  • Popcorn (okay in moderation; always unsalted, unbuttered, plain air-popped)
  • Pork/Ham
  • Corn
  • Shrimp
  • Bread (small amounts)
  • Plain yogurt
  • Tuna (in moderation)
  • Honey
  • Salmon
  • Coconut
  • Peanuts
  • Cashews

Fruits and Veggies dogs can have:

  • ApplesWaiting for something to drop!
  • Bananas (as a treat only; bananas are high in sugar)
  • Watermelon (no rinds or seeds)
  • Oranges (peels aren’t toxic, but they’re rough on dogs’ digestion, so don’t feed)
  • Pineapple
  • Strawberries
  • Raspberries (less than one cup)
  • Mangoes (remove the pit)
  • Blueberries
  • Peaches (fresh, not canned; cut up)
  • Pears (without pits or seeds)
  • Carrots
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Potatoes (fully cooked)
  • Broccoli (very small amounts)
  • Celery (freshens breath, too!)
  • Cucumbers

Of course, most people foods should be in moderation only. Hopefully this list gives you an idea of what Fido can and cannot eat, so you’ll both have a safe and happy Labor Day!

What people foods do you give your dog? Share in the comments below!

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TO RAISE, OR NOT TO RAISE?

A lot has been said about the raising of a dog's food and water bowls. So, how do you know which is right for your dog? From a distance raising the bowls seems like a more comfortable option for larger breed dogs, but recent studies have shown that a raised food bowl may increase the chance of bloat.

Bloat in dogs is much more serious than that feeling you get when leaving a buffet. Bloat in dogs is when there is an excessive amount of air, fluid or food in the stomach. As the stomach swells it may twist, trapping all the contents in the stomach. This is more common in larger, deeper chested breeds and is the second leading cause of death in dogs. So, what’s more important, your dog’s daily comfort or preventing a possible risk of bloat? That decision is in the hands of the owner.

Pros

Courtesy of highdoggiediner.com

Courtesy of highdoggiediner.com

  • Prevents staining on the dog’s neck and back.
  • Improves the dog’s posture.
  • Makes swallowing easier.
  • Prevents vomiting after meals because the gravity pushes the food and water down.
  • Lessens shoulder and joint pain.

Of course, one of the most obvious of all is the comfort. Imagine eating your food ducked over and   looking down at your plate. It couldn’t be the most comfortable of positions and could put a strain on your joints and limbs as well.

Con

  • Bloat.

Bloat is the only con, but the scariest. At one point in time it was thought that the raised food bowl decreased the risk of bloat, but recent findings have shown the exact opposite. Purdue University did a study called Purdue Bloat Notes, finding that raising food bowls could be a major factor in bloat cases. Dr. Glickman (J Am Vet Med Association) is a researcher who conducted a five year bloat study; found that 20 to 50 percent of large and giant breed dogs with bloat could attribute it to the raising of food bowls.

Many dog owners have their own opinions to what they think about raising their dog’s food bowl. Either you can’t stand to see your pooch bent over chomping food or you can’t stand the thought that there could be a correlation between your dogs twisted stomach and a heightened food bowl. So the true question is, to raise, or not to raise?

Feature picture courtesy of apartmenttherapy.com

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