Category Archives: Good Health

Grain Free Dog Food Diet

Grain-free is becoming an increasingly popular dog food diet. Some critics believe humans are simply mirroring their own food habits in their pets, but there are cases where a grain-free diet can be beneficial for your furry friend, mainly: allergies.

So what are the symptoms of a pet with allergies?

  • Itchiness
  • Excessive hair loss
  • Bald patches
  • Inflamed skin
  • Sores
  • Scabs

If your dog is experiencing the above symptoms, it’s possible they’re allergic to something, but don’t assume the culprit is grain. In a recent study conducted by Veterinary Dermatology, only 7 of 278 dog allergy cases were found to be caused by corn; 95 dogs were found to be allergic to beef.

Some pet owners believe that since the ancestral dogs ate a grain-free diet, so should the dogs of today. This is not necessarily true. Modern dogs have evolved, and so have their dietary needs, just as we humans have seen our nutrition needs change.

The most important thing to consider when choosing a grain-free diet for your dog is that the meal provides balanced and complete nutrition. Some dog foods are grain free, but the ingredients used to replace the grains is simply filler, and not ideal nutrition for your pet. If your dog has inappropriate nutrition, he’ll be unhealthy, and as a loving pet parent, this is the last thing you want!

When choosing the right grain-free dog food for your dog, do your research read the labels, and talk to your veterinarian to make sure you’re taking the right steps to help keep your four-legged friend as healthy as possible. dogfoodadvisor.com is a great resource with third-party analysis of every dog food on the market. Your pet food should have a healthy mix of protein, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, even if it is grain-free!

bogo_bagshot_grainfreeBOGO Bowl Grain-Free Chicken Formula and Whitefish Duck dog foods provide the right blend of all natural protein, healthy vegetables, and fruits. We don’t use corn, soy, or weight, or artificial ingredients. Learn more here.

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Elliot the Service Dog

By Lyndsay Marvin

Not only do dogs make amazing pets, many of them make wonderful service dogs. A service dog means “any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability, as defined by Title II and Title III of the ADA” (https://adata.org/publication/service-animals-booklet).

Ruby and ElliotRuby Jean Furth, 17, started training Elliot as a service dog a few years after she received a diagnosis for bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder is a psychiatric disorder characterized by extreme episodes of depression and mania. Ruby graciously answered a few questions for BOGO Bowl about Elliot and how he helps her live a better life.
1. Where did you meet Elliot? Was he chosen specifically to be a service dog?

I met Elliot on a rainy day, April 29, 2012. He was not chosen to be a service dog; he was meant to help lift my depression (this was before I was diagnosed bipolar at age 13). I got him from the Humane Society [when he was] 11 weeks old.

2. What led to the decision to train Elliot to be a service dog? What is he (will he be) a service dog for?

What led to the decision to train Elliot to be a service dog was simply the need for one. I read more about Psychiatric Service Dogs and knew having one would benefit me. Elliot is an Australian Cattle Dog, known for their excellence at herding and being good farm hands. We live in the city and Elliot was raised with an iron fist as his breed was one known to be hard headed and stubborn. Elliot proved to be a fast learner, a cooperative friend and someone to teach me how to love again.

Elliot in his gearI didn’t know until he was 4 years old that he would be my service dog. I came across Aurum Canine Services, a small local service dog training business run by a woman named Dana Daniels. She evaluated him and said he’d be a great candidate, a rarity when adopting a dog from the shelter. Within less than two months, Dana realized how much training Elliot had already been given by me and turned the time to train him from 6 months down to only 2. I started teaching him alerts during his Public Access work and he excelled at both.

3. What are some of the things Elliot does to help you?

Elliot is in training to alert my anger episodes, respond to my anxiety by interrupting, interrupting self-harm such as hitting myself, deep pressure therapy during anxiety episodes, blocking me from the front and back when I feel anxious about people around me, and being there whenever I need him.

4. How long does it/will it take to train Elliot? How does he become certified?

Elliot soothesThere is actually no such thing as “certifying” a service dog. The IAADP states that a service dog must know at least 2 tasks that mitigate the handlers’ disability, have at least 120 hours of training, and 30 hours of public access work. This means getting them used to everything and anything, like taking them to crowded areas, passing another dog, going to movies, attending their handler to doctors appointments, all while being focused on their handler/ being relaxed or sleeping when necessary, as well as “tucking” under their owner in public setting to remain as unnoticeable as possible and out of the way.

5. What makes Elliot the best pup ever?

Elliot can be the perfect gentleman when out in public and then be there to be my running or biking partner after his working is done. He is such a versatile dog, I couldn’t ask for anything else

6. Is there anything else you’d like to share about Elliot?

We get plenty of hate from other service dog handlers since I don’t have a “typical breed” for service dog work, as well as judging Elliot before they know him, such as assuming his height, weight, and what gear he wears as well. People assume I use him for mobility, which is not true. I’ve been called a dog abuser, scum, the worst handler ever, but my trainer, Elliot, family, and all my friends know that is not the case. Elliot loves me and loves his job as well as the rest of his family. I just need to stand through the hate.

Thank you Ruby for sharing with us, and we are so glad you have Elliot to help you with every day life!

Each month, BOGO Bowl will be spotlighting a service animal on our blog. Elliot is the first of the series.

Training Video: https://youtu.be/d40Vfl7VmVQ

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Are Your Pets Overweight? It’s National Pet Obesity Awareness Day

By Lyndsay Marvin

Did you know today is National Pet Obesity Awareness Day? On October 12, 2016, the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) will conduct the Tenth Annual National Pet Obesity Awareness Day survey.

Pet obesity is a serious problem in America. An estimated 53.8% of US dogs are overweight or obese (BCS 4-5), and an estimated 58.2% of US cats are overweight or obese (BCS 4-5). Obesity in pets can cause type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, and many forms of cancer. It can also decrease life expectancy by 2.5 years (and we definitely don’t want that!).

Approximately 65% of US households own at least one pet. That’s 79.7 million homes (source: 2016 APPA). In addition, 68% of adult Americans are overweight or obese, which is approximately 148 million people (source: 2015 CDC). There seems to be a pattern.

Here are a few facts:

  • 41.9 million US dogs are estimated to be overweight or obese
  • 26.1 million US dogs are estimated to be overweight (BCS 4)
  • 15.7 million US dogs are estimated to be obese (BCS 5)
    (based on 77.8 million US dogs - 2016 APPA)
  • An estimated 20.2% of US dogs are obese (BCS 5)
  • 49.9 million US cats are estimated to be overweight or obese (BCS 4-5)
  • 23.7 million US cats are estimated to be overweight (BCS 4)
  • 26.2 million US cats are estimated to be obese (BCS 5) (based on 85.8 million US cats - 2016 APPA)
  • An estimated 28.1% of US cats are obese (BCS 5)

All figures 2015 Association for Pet Obesity Prevention.

Common overweight dogs are bulldogs, yorkies, dachshunds, and chihuahuas.

Pet obesity is serious. What are you doing to ensure your pet stays at a healthy weight?
Our recommendations are:

  • Make sure they get enough exercise (walking, running, playing).
  • Feed them healthy food (like ours!).
  • Feed them the appropriate amount of food.
  • Limit the amount of treats they receive.
  • We offer Healthy Weight Dog Formula, which you can find here.

overweight-pets2

Statistics Source:  http://petobesityprevention.org/pet-obesity-fact-risks/

 

 

 

 

 

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