Monthly Archives: June 2013

I'M COMING HOME, SOLDIER DOG STORIES

For dogs having to part with their soldier mommy and daddy when he or she gets deployed can be heart wrenching. The time away can seem to last forever. Dogs may not have any conception of time, but they notice all the mornings they wake up and their best friend isn't there to let them outside, or take them for a walk. They know that their soldier isn't there to scratch them behind their ears or to snuggle up to them in bed.

Seeing a dog being reunited with their best friend after so long apart makes it evident how much a dog can miss and yearn for their human’s presence. Dog's wiggling butts and ecstatic jumping show how much compassion they have. Some dogs will cry out with emotion, just like a child does when his or her dad comes home from war.

Meet Emma

Emma is a little girl with a severe birth defect. It’s hard for her to use her back legs. Emma and her dad were very close before he was deployed. He was gone for six months before returning. Typically when Emma’s mom comes in the door she just waits at the end of the hallway. It was a different story when Emma’s dad got home.

Check Emma out on Facebook!

Meet Ranger

Ranger loves his “Green Monster” toy and his dad. Imagine Ranger surprise when he returns with “Green Monster” to find his dad home from deployment. Ranger cries out with excitement, all while keeping ahold of Green Monster!

Military Home Coming Mash-up

Here’s a set of videos to warm your heart right up. It captures every dog’s tail wag, howl and excited leap into the arms of their soldier. Each butt jiggle and face lick is another happy ending for these military pups.

Do you have a good story of a loved one coming home to their best friend?

Image Courtesy of Kootation.com

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Toothbrushing dog

THE IMPORTANCE OF GROOMING

Could you imagine going out with your hair snarly, ears plugged, fingernails over grown, and smelling like you haven't bathed in a month? Do you wonder how people would look at you? Or how you would feel about yourself?

If you couldn't imagine putting yourself through the scrutiny of going out like you've been neglecting personal hygiene, why make your dog? A dog's personal hygiene is just as important as making sure they get to the vet.

Brushing

Brushing your dog all depends on the kind of dog you own and their breed. If you have a short haired dog they'll need weekly brushing. A long haired dog can possibly need daily brushing. Brushing your dog is one of the simplest things you can do to keep your dog, your black clothes and your couch happy and healthy.

  • Brushing removes dead hair and skin.
  • It spreads natural oils through their coat.
  • Helps dogs from developing an odor.

Ears

A dog's ears should be looked at and cleaned often. When you examine your dog's ears make sure they are a healthy pink color. If you notice your dog's ears are sensitive to the touch, have brown, black or yellow discharge, have a foul odor or they are shaking their head constantly, take your dog to the vet immediately to have their ear examined.

The easiest way to clean your dog's ear is to simply take a cotton ball and carefully wipe the outer ear. Be very careful to not touch any part of the ear that can't easily be seen.

  • Cleaning the ear regularly prevents ear infections.
  • Cleaning also prevents illness from infections.

Teeth

Teeth should be cleaned at the very least once a month. Out of all three year old dogs 80 percent of them have a build-up of plaque or tarter on their teeth and below the gum line.

  • Not brushing your dog’s teeth causes gum infections.
  • It causes tooth loss.
  • It can also cause a case of bad breath and dirty looking teeth.
  • Bad gums and teeth have been linked to kidney and secondary heart disease in dogs.

Toes

Nail-trimming can be a pet owners and pets most dreaded activity. Regardless, it still must be done. Dog's nails should not touch the ground and especially not curl over. Be careful not to trim a dog's nails too far down. If a dog's nails are trimmed to the quick, it could bleed. If bleeding occurs just apply pressure until the bleeding stops.

Courtesy of Tigertailfoods.com

Courtesy of Tigertailfoods.com

Also, make sure you use nail clippers designed for animals. Another good strategy to make nail-trimming less stressful on you and your dog is to only cut a couple of nails a day. They will eventually all get cut just one nail at a time!

  • If a dog's nails are not trimmed it can place unneeded stress on dog's paws.
  • Untrimmed nails can lead to foot problems.

Bath

The very word can make your dog coward behind the couch or under the table- bath. Bath time is necessary even if it isn't fun for either parties. The good news is the more often you bush the less you have to bath.

  • Make sure you brush before you bath, mats and tangles will just get worse in water.
  • Always use dog shampoo. People shampoo is harmful to a dog's skin, it dries it out and destroys the dog's natural oils.
  • Make sure you rinse out all the soap. Leftover soap can irritate skin.

Dog grooming isn't always fun but it will save your dog the embarrassment of walking around looking dirty and unhealthy. Dog grooming will ensure you and your dog can live a happy, healthy, hygienic life.

 

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HOW TO SHAKE OFF THOSE EXTRA BISCUITS

Have you noticed your dog's belly is hanging a little lower? Maybe that your dog's more interested in exploring the fabric of the couch than the backyard? Or that there's a little more wiggling going on than just in his tail?

Like a lot of humans, as a dog's age moves up in numbers, so often does the scale. Exercising may not sound as fun as playing to your dog, but in actuality it can be the same thing! There are lots of good ways for your dog to burn some calories and have a good time doing it.

Walking

This may sound like an obvious one, but so often “potty breaks” can be thought of as walks. A quick walk down the block so your dog can use the restroom doesn’t count as exercise. A decent walk should last a good 15-20 minutes, if not longer. The amount of exercise a dog needs really depends on the type of dog they are. A bigger dog will need more exercise then a little one.

Fetch

Fetch is a favorite in most dogs’ book. Fetch offers dogs a good amount of exercise and for some gives them an opportunity to practice something they were bred for. In a lot of dogs it is in their nature to retrieve. Let’s be honest though, most dogs love a good game of fetch. Fetch also gives you and your dog great bonding time.

A good way to give your dog even more exercise when playing fetch is the run him up and down the stairs. This will engage more muscles than regular fetch because of the elevation. Just stand at the top of the stairs and throw a toy down and have your dog bring it back up to you. This could wear him out after a few throws. This exercise may not be appropriate for every dog, such as a Dachshund, because it could put too much strain on its back.

Laser Pointer

Not all dogs find the little red dot intriguing enough to pursue, but some dogs do. You can test it out and see if your dog shows interest, if he does it is great exercise. You can run the laser back and forth across the room and enjoy the show. The only thing to be cautious of is to never point the laser directly in your dog’s eyes.

Dog Park

If your town has a local dog park, it will offer excellent exercise. Dog parks aren’t appropriate for every dog, but if your dog does well with other dogs, it can be really fun. It gives your dog great opportunities to socialize with other dogs and people in a safe environment. A dog park gives your dog the chance to run leash free and leave his inhibitions at the fence.

Frisbee

Some dogs love playing with a Frisbee, but some are not too sure about it. Make sure the Frisbee you’re playing with is a dog disc; a human disc can hurt a dog. Teaching a dog to play Frisbee can be a great bonding experience for you and your dog, as you work together. There are even disc dog competitions where dogs do some pretty awesome stuff. There are things like distance catching and choreographed freestyle catching.

Dancing

That’s right, dancing. Maybe you’re not the best dancer; maybe your musically inclined canine might teach you a few things. That’s okay no one has to know you learned your best skills from Fido. People take dancing with their dog to a whole new level. This doesn’t mean you doing the disco or robot while your dog circles you excitedly. These people and dogs know how to get down with the get down, while getting some great exercise!

Here’s Ashleigh and Pudsey on Britain’s Got Talent 2012 Semi-Finals.

So, if you have noticed Fido’s been tipping the scales at the veterinarian you may want to consider these easy exercising routines. Not only will it prevent your dog from getting some scary health problems related to weight gain but it will give you and him great bonding time. So put down those biscuits and pick up a ball and have some fun!

 

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